Students with Disabilities

Employment Information for Students with Disabilities

Today, more postsecondary graduates with disabilities are entering the workforce. There are numerous resources available to help you, both on line and in person.

Remember the Career & Student Success Advisors are here to help - you can set up a meeting to explore career options, get help with job interview preparation, or just for general advice as you begin your job search.

We hope you will take advantage of the services that we provide in the Academic & Career Success Centre, from resume and cover letter reviews to the CareerConnect - Job Portal and interview preparation - we can help you at each step in the process.

You can also check out our events calendar to find out what's taking place, follow us on social media, or drop by our offices to find out what's new!

Stay up to date on our Transition to Work for Persons with Disabilities events, by checking out our event site. This event is focused on helping students and recent grads with disabilities build career-ready skills for meaningful employment.

  • Ask anyone you know who works there. They may be aware of an employee who was accommodated. Is it a high pressure workplace (eg. Do people eat lunch at their desks? Do staff take breaks?) Are people collegial, friendly?
  • Go to the employer's website. If the website is accessible, it may mean that the company is disability-friendly, or at least have implemented some accommodations.
  • Check the company's policies - do they give sick leave? Is the work flexible? Does the company promote a work/life balance? Do they have a policy or statement about mental health (awareness/promotion)? Do they have a policy or statement on physical health (awareness/promotion)?
  • If possible, check out the physical space (they may have photos on their website, you could ask someone who works there, or just drop by yourself). Look to see if the space is wheelchair accessible; check out the washrooms; and check if signage is large and/or in braille. Although you may not need these accommodations, it's an indication of the willingness of the employer to implement them.

Deciding if, when, and how to disclose your disability can be a tough decision, but it's up to you. There may be additional things to consider such as whether you mention your disability in your cover letter or resume, during the interview or at the time of the job offer. Review the document "Disclosing Your Disability" for more tips, or visit this Online Resource for more information.

Students interested in expanding their job search resources, learning more about their skills, educational pathways, job search techniques, networking and interview tips, may book a one-on-one appointment with a program specific Career & Student Success Advisor.

  • Visit the Meet Our Advisors page to contact your program-specific Career & Student Success Advisor.
  • Students who are unable to attend an in-person appointment can request to complete their session via telephone or via email.

In addition to Humber's CareerConnect Job Portal where you can check out current job postings - full-time, part-time, internships, summer and volunteer opportunities, take a look at the "Job Search Resources for Student" for information regarding agencies with programs that specialize in increasing access to employment.

When applying for a job, most employers will ask you to submit a resume and cover letter. Advising & Career Services has Career Support Peers (CSPs) who can help you. You can book an appointment to meet in-person, with a CSP who will help you to create or improve your resume, or submit it online for edits through our Resume Review Portal.

Interviews can be daunting, and it's normal to be nervous before an interview. We recommend you meet with a Career Support Peer for a simulated job interview preparation session. It only takes an hour of your time to gain some confidence for your next job interview. You will:

  • gain insights into how to approach different types of questions;
  • learn tips for focusing on your skills, qualifications and abilities that are on your resume; and
  • be able to communicate why you are an asset to the company that you're applying to.

It's also important that you create strategies to help you cope with nervousness, like eating well and getting proper rest before an interview, or using meditation and deep breaths to slow your heart beat. For more detailed tips and resources, read through our "Job Interview Tips".

If you require accommodations for the interview, be sure to make the request when you are invited to the interview. For more information and tips on when and how to disclose your disability, please read this resource "Disclosing Your Disability".

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